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child and baby first aid

First Aid For Babies and Children

As all mums and dads will know, there is no better cure for little bumps and grazes than a few kisses and cuddles.

However, when more serious injuries occur it is important to perform the correct first aid procedures.

The British Red Cross believes every parent should have basic first aid skills and they offer a wide range of teaching methods to suit your needs, including practical first aid courses often the preferred method of learning baby and child first aid.


How to deal with a choking baby
Choking

treatment for a choking baby

or child is a skill all parents should know. Remember: The procedure is slightly different for babies (under one) and children (aged one to puberty). Follow the steps below:

For a baby (birth to one):
1. If the baby is unable to cough, sit or kneel and lay them face down along your forearm (with their head low) rested on your slightly lowered thigh and support their body and head.
2. Using the heel of your hand, give up to five back blows between their shoulder blades.
3. Turn them face up, supporting their body and head and check their mouth for any dislodged objects.
4. If they are still choking, place two fingers on the lower half of the baby's breastbone (a finger's breadth below the nipples) and give up to five sharp thrusts, inwards and towards the head.
5. Check the mouth for any dislodges objects.
6. If this does not work call an ambulance until and repeat the back blows and abdominal thrusts until help arrives. If the child is unresponsive, give CPR.

toddler choking



For a child (one to puberty):
1. If they are unable to cough up the obstruction, bend the child over and give them five sharp blows between the shoulder blades with the heel of the hand.
2. Check the mouth for dislodged objects.
3. If they are still choking, give the child up to 5 abdominal thrusts. To do this place a clenched fist above their belly button and grasp your fist with your other hand. Pull inwards and upwards five times.
4. Call 999 and repeat the back blows and abdominal thrusts until help arrives. If the child becomes unconscious, give CPR.

CPR

If your baby

baby CPR

or child is unconscious and not breathing, CPR is a crucial technique that can potentially save their life. Remember: The procedure is slightly different for babies (under one) and children (aged one to puberty). Follow the steps below:

For a baby (birth to one):

 


If there is anything in their mouth pick it out and ensure the airway is clear and open.

  1. Take a breath in and place your lips around the baby’s mouth and nose to form an airtight seal.
  2. If you cannot make a seal around the mouth and nose, close the baby’s mouth and make a seal around the nose only.
  3. Blow steadily into the mouth until the chest rises.
  4. Remove your mouth and allow the chest to fall.
  5. Repeat four times more.
  6. Now Give 30 chest compressions.



For a child (one to puberty):

The Recovery Position

If you find your baby or child breathing but

baby recovery position

unconscious it is important to place them in the recovery position. This prevents them from swallowing their tongue and stops the windpipe from being blocked if they were to be sick.

Remember: The procedure is slightly different for babies (under one) and children (aged one to puberty). 


For a baby (birth to one):
1. Simply cradle the baby in your arms with its head tilted downwards



For a child (birth to one):
1. Place the child's arm nearest to you at a right angle with their palm facing up.
2. Move their other arm round, placing the back of the hand on the cheek closest to you.
3. Grab the knee furthest from you and pull up until the knee is flat on the floor.
4. Pull the knee towards you whilst keeping the child's hand pressed against their cheek. Move the leg so it is at a right angle.
5. Make sure the airway remains open by tilting their head back. Check for breathing by feeling and listening for breath.

To watch a video on this subject please visit the British Red Cross Children First Aid site;

Burns

child burn advice

Burns and scalds to the skin can be distressing for children. If your child is injured this way, it is important to stay calm and follow the following procedure:
1. Examine the burn.
2. Cool the affected area under cold running for at least ten minutes.
3. Cover the injury with a sterile burns dressing or cling film.
4. If the burn is severe call 999/112. If the casualty is a child or baby, you should see medical advice no matter how small the burn appears to be.

To watch a video on this subject please visit the British Red Cross Children First Aid site:

High Temperatures

febrile convulsion

If your baby or child looks hot and flushed and is running a high temperature, there are steps you can take to help them recover.
1. Check their temperature- if it is over 37°C it is considered high. The child or enfant may look hot and flushed and may also sweat. Sometimes extremely high temperatures can cause seizures in a baby or young child (twitching and clenched fists are signs of this).
2. If they have a high temperature, remove any blankets and clothing to cool them down.
3. If you can give them some paracetemol-based medicine.
4. If symptoms continue you should seek medical advice or take them to the hospital.

To watch a video on this subject please visit the British Red Cross Children First Aid site:

If you have been inspired to learn more essential first aid skills you can book onto a baby and child course here at Red Cross First Aid Courses

Mar 2014

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