PARENTING ADVICE: 10 TIPS ON HOW TO DEAL WTH TODDLER TANTRUMS

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TIPS ON HOW TO DEAL WTH TODDLER TANTRUMS
TIPS ON HOW TO DEAL WTH TODDLER TANTRUMS
Skylark Learning, the early childhood education company delivering innovative resources†to enable children to learn through meaningful play, provides ten useful tips on how to deal with toddler tantrums effectively; helping to empower parents and nurture a happy little human.





Tantrums are a normal part of a childís development and all parents have to deal with them but how do you respond to your child if they throw a tantrum in a public place? Having a child scream or shout can often be distressing for parents, making you feel helpless, angry or embarrassed.



1. Firstly, donít panic. We know thatís easy to say but try to stay calm. Remind yourself that the tantrum is temporary and it wonít last forever, just let it run its course.


2. Validate your childís emotion and acknowledge how they are feeling. Anxiety, confusion and sadness are often disguised through screaming, shouting and crying.

3. Remind your child of the rules and set boundaries Ė for example, if you are in a restaurant, remind your child that there are other people eating their food and that it is polite to not make too much noise.


4. Ignore the tantrum. Yes, we did just say that. After initial validation and boundary setting, ignore the tantrum. Calmly continue with whatever you were doing and tell your child that you will talk to them when they are calmer.


5. Keep ignoring the negative behaviour and donít give your child attention. This is OK, because you validated their feeling initially, and you donít need to continuously validate it.


6. Give warm attention for any positive behaviour and praise your child when they stop the tantrum.


7. Children may misbehave when they are scared or confused Ė discuss what feelings are with your child and explore why they make them behave in that way.


8. Your child will not be able to get everything they want all the time Ė they are allowed to be disappointed. Manage expectations and validate their feelings without giving in to unrealistic demands.


9. Look after yourself, as a parent, and take time for self-care so that when a negative situation arises, you will be in a better position to handle it in a positive way.


10. Remind yourself that negative emotions are not to be feared, but are a normal part of life.

Try and see them as opportunities to help your child learn how to cope. The above tips have been taken from the Parentís Guide in My First Emotions, an exciting multisensory resource designed to help children learn to understand and manage their feelings.
Set to launch Spring 2017, My First Emotions is available to pre-order from www.skylarkenglish.com at a discounted pre-order price of £49 (RRP £69)

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